Buddy Up For Bikram

Image By ScalesonFire.com
Image By ScalesonFire.com

After taking a Vinyasa course, I chose to do Bikram for day-two of my yoga challenge. I know Bikram is super trendy right now, so this probably isn’t a surprise, but I promise, I did not take Bikram to “lose weight like the stars” (Rebecca Romijn recently credited losing 60 lbs. of post-pregnancy weight to the practice). Even founder Bikram Choundry, himself touts his practice as the more glamorous yoga, but honestly, I just went with a friend who does Bikram regularly and I was really pleased with the experience.

If there’s one thing I can say about Bikram, it’s always good to go with a friend. I had done Bikram before and I liked it, but I didn’t care for the instructor’s boot camp teaching style or the stuffy studio that smelled of feet. The studio I tried recently was filled with light and a patient instructor — two things my other experiences at a Bikram College did not include. I learned the room in which you practice yoga, matters. Clearly, for me, having light and windows is important, but a yoga buddy was essential both times, too.

I don’t know what it is, I guess I like knowing someone else is there enduring the challenge with me, it’s such an intense experience, it’s comforting knowing you have someone there to support you, talk about it afterward and be there in case you feel a little woozy.

So, what’s Bikram like? Well, I think many people feel intimidated by the practice because they don’t like being hot and sweaty, or the 90 minutes of 100-plus-degrees and humidity seem unbearable, but the truth is, with the right mindset, a bottle of water and an absorbent yoga towel, Bikram is a cleansing and rewarding experience.

In “A Guide to Bikram Yoga,” Tessa Rottiers, Founder and instructor of Bikram Yoga Melbourne, believes there are many benefits to practicing Bikram, “In the short term you will sleep better, feel happier, be less injury prone with a more energetic and toned body. In the long term, you will have overall improved physical and mental health.”

While this is probably true of many forms of yoga, I really found her point about sleeping better to be particularly true. Yes, you sweat more during these classes than anything else I’ve experienced (including spinning!), but you gain so much energy afterward because your circulation is restored and you’ve perspired so much, you feel clean of any toxins and stress. And, with all that revived vigor, a good night’s rest is a guarantee. It’s like your body secretes all the bad stuff that’s inside with all the perspiration, so it can be released.

Most Bikram classes are similar. You begin with standing poses and end with floor exercises — 26 therapeutic postures in total that are said to improve your circulation and flush out the endocrine and nervous systems. During the class you perform intense breathing exercises and hold poses longer than other practices like Vinyasa. It requires absolute concentration. Seriously, do not go to Bikram if you don’t think you’ll have the patience or concentration to steady yourself and hold poses without letting your mind wander. Of course, that’s also part of the appeal, finding that intense focus in the midst of your day. And, trust me, as soon as your body temperature starts to rise and you’re holding a strenuous pose, you’ll start to feel every bead of sweat slowly making it’s way down your body. The trick is to stop thinking and go to a place where you know you can hold the pose and that’s all that matters — not the heat, the pain in your muscles, the thirst, or the tickle of sweat down the bridge of your nose.

How much sweat are we talking? A yoga instructor in Denver was interviewed about hydration (and the benefits of coconut water) after Bikram and he estimates up to a gallon of water loss from one class, according to a report by ABC Action News.  So, drink up after Bikram to help your body and muscles recover. During class, remember to take things slow and to always continue to breathe. “Avoid injury by easing into postures the first few times, then as you get to know the practice, you can use your breath as your guide,” says instructor Tessa Rottiers, “if you stop breathing, stop stretching.” She also says that dizziness and nausea are common for newbies, but taking potassium or sodium tablets before class can help.

This challenging heated practice is supposed to help you release tension and pain — physical and emotional — without over exertion. For those looking to increase their flexibility, Bikram will also move your goals forward even more because your joints and muscles get so warmed up. However, this is also the risk of Bikram, it’s easy to injure yourself at such high temperatures, whether it be from overstretching or dehydration.Yet, like I said, if you have water and you’re focused on what you’re doing, you’ll know when to take care of your body and when to push yourself. And, if you go with a buddy, you can rely on each other for support and a friendly reminder to take things easy.

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